The PrEPARE Project

Project Status: Current
People Involved: Martin Holt, Toby Lea, Dean Murphy, John de Wit
Research Areas: HIV & Sexual Health Risk & Risk Reduction
Funding Agency: NSW Health, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
Partners / Collaborators: Social Policy Research Centre, UNSWGoldsmiths College, University of LondonACONPositive Life NSW

The PrEPARE Project is investigating the attitudes of gay and bisexual men to new HIV prevention technologies, particularly pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention. The first phase of the project, conducted in 2011–2012, involved an online survey of over 1500 men and qualitative interviews with a subset of those men. This phase identified that a relatively small proportion of gay and bisexual men were very interested in using PrEP, and that willingness to use PrEP was concentrated among men who appeared to be most at risk of HIV. We also compared the attitudes of HIV-positive and HIV-negative men towards PrEP and treatment as prevention, revealing ongoing scepticism about treatment as prevention in both groups of men. Follow-up online surveys were conducted in 2013 and in 2015, showing increasingly positive attitudes to treatment as prevention in particular. The next round of data collection will take place in 2017. 


Publications

Gay men’s attitudes to biomedical HIV prevention: Key findings from the PrEPARE Project 2015. (PDF) [2 Mb]

Increasing belief in the effectiveness of HIV treatment as prevention: results of repeated, national surveys of Australian gay and bisexual men, 2013-15. (Published in AIDS and Behavior, 2016). http://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-016-1306-0

Interest in using rectal microbicides among Australian gay men is associated with perceived HIV vulnerability and engaging in condomless sex with casual partners: results from a national survey. (Published in Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2015). http://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2014-051694

Australian gay and bisexual men’s attitudes to HIV treatment as prevention in repeated, national surveys, 2011-2013. (Published in PLoS One, 2014). http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112349

Willingness to use HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis has declined among Australian gay and bisexual men: results from repeated national surveys, 2011-2013. (Published in Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 2014) http://doi.org/10.1097/QAI.0000000000000287

HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention: a review of awareness and acceptability among men who have sex with men in the Asia Pacific and the Americas. (Published in Sexual Health, 2014). http://doi.org/10.1071/SH13060

HIV-negative and HIV-positive gay men’s attitudes to medicines, HIV treatments and antiretroviral-based prevention. (Published in AIDS & Behavior, 2013). http://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-012-0313-z

Willingness to use HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis and the likelihood of decreased condom use are both associated with unprotected anal intercourse and the perceived likelihood of becoming HIV-positive among Australian gay and bisexual men. (Published in Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2013). http://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2011-05031

Willingness to use and have sex with men taking HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP): results of online surveys of Australian gay and bisexual men. (Published in Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2017). http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2016-052774

Awareness and knowledge of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis among Australian gay and bisexual men: results of a national, online survey. (Published in Sexual Health, 2016). http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/SH15243


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