3D project: diagnosis, disclosure, discrimination and living with Hepatitis C

Project Status: Archive
People Involved: Max Hopwood, Carla Treloar
Research Areas: Living with and Treatment of Serious & Chronic Conditions

The aim of the 3D Project was to explore the experiences of diagnosis, disclosure and discrimination among people living with hepatitis C. The study involved quantitative and qualitative research components with Phase 1 consisting of a self-administered short-form questionnaire (n = 504) that focused on three main areas. These were: (i) the impacts of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on people’s relationships, work and interactions with health care service providers (ii) the impacts and outcomes of disclosing a hepatitis C positive serostatus (iii) and discrimination and its effects on those living with hepatitis C, including ability and desire to access health care. Analysis of these data provided a clear framework for formulating research questions explored during Phase 2. Phase 2 of the 3D project comprised the qualitative component, consisting of in-depth, semi-structured interviews with (n = 19) people with hepatitis C. This was a comparative study of experiences of diagnosis, disclosure and discrimination and the role of social support in relation to these. Data analysis for this project was completed in 2003 and a report, The 3D Project: diagnosis, disclosure, discrimination and living with hepatitis C, was launched in October 2003. A number of papers have been published from this study.


Publications

Max Hopwood, Carla, Treloar: 3D project: Diagnosis, disclosure, discrimination and living with Hepatitis C. Monograph 6/2003.  (PDF) [557 Kb]